FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Helpful information about our services!

 

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How does rigdon wash windows?

We apply mild soap and water formula (with Dawn dishwashing liquid) to the window surface using a “wand” or soft applicator, and swirl it over the window surface to loosen dirt and grime. This solution is removed from the window surface using a rubber squeegee. If there is paint overspray, hard water spots, or accumulated dirt and grime due to neglect, we will employ the use of a straight-edged scraper.



how does rigdon count windows?

We count a window as a window…that is, each framed window equals one window or “surface”. Note that it is common for builders to put 3 windows contiguous to each other. Those would be counted as 3 windows. The same would apply to bay windows. We use the term “surfaces” in the quantity description of our packages to give you greater flexibility. A package of 30 surfaces allows you to clean 15 exterior, and 15 interior windows; 20 exterior and 10 interior windows; or any combination of exterior / interior windows totaling the package quantity.

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How to prepare for service

WINDOW CLEANING: Please remove any items blocking access to windows. Window treatments do not necessarily need to be removed, but secured out of the way. Please raise blinds and open shutters prior to our arrival.

GUTTER CLEANING / PATIO POWER WASHING: Please move any furniture, planters, pots, grills, etc. that may impede our access of areas to be cleaned.

Please make sure pets are secured.

NOTE: Rigdon is not liable for damage to items that were not moved or window treatments that were not opened / secured prior to our arrival.


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did we skip a window?

SKIPPED WINDOW: If after service you have a window that looks like this window, you may suspect it was accidentally skipped during service, and you may be right. If so, we’ll gladly return to clean it. However, 95% of the time, the window is clean - it just has looks “dirty”, “filmy”, or “cloudy”, because it has a BROKEN SEAL just like the sample in the image. The window is, in fact, clean, it just appears dirty because the seal that traps the inert gas between the two window panes has failed, and regular air has seeped between the panes. This means that moisture, dust, pollen, etc. can accumulate. You may not notice this until the outward facing glass surfaces are cleaned. Unfortunately, there is no way to clean between the panes, and repairing broken seals is not very reliable. Usually window replacement is the only solution. The standard window cleaning techniques used by Rigdon cannot damage the seal. They fail over time due to age, dry-rot, UV ray exposure, or poor manufacturing. We will alert homeowners PRIOR to cleaning if we suspect a broken seal.


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IS THAT A SCRATCH?

Glass can be scratched - but not from a rubber squeegee, fleece wand, or soapy water. When a homeowner sees scratches, window cleaners are often erroneously blamed. Why? Because when windows are dirty, scratches are not as noticeable, so when the windows are cleaned, they stand out. Even scrapers, when used correctly, won’t harm glass. So where did the scratches come from? A good majority are from paint over spray removal using worn-out scrapers…either by a DIY homeowner or painting company. Sometimes scratches occur during remodels or new construction when concrete or stucco splashes onto the window and it is wiped or scraped off by the crew. Lastly, although we see it less often, it is because of the glass itself. For a period of time, some window manufacturers were using sub-quality tempered. The faulty glass was manufactured with microscopic air bubbles on the surface of the glass, that shatter with the slightest pressure (like a squeegee). Those tiny glass shards scratch the window surface during the normal cleaning process. Rigdon will alert homeowners PRIOR to cleaning if we are concerned about any tempered glass or we see scratches. For more information about this issue, click HERE.